Healthy

Scientific Breakthrough Shows New Way To Attack And Kill Cancer Cells

In the ever-changing world of cancer treatment options, scientists have made a breakthrough creating a promising step forward in the battle against the deadly disease.  They have found a new way and method to trigger the death of cancer cells.

Named Caspase-Independent Cell Death (CICD), the treatment has shown to completely eradicate tumors in colorectal cancer cells that had been grown in the lab.  According to the team at the University of Glasgow in the UK, if the same cancer cell killing results could be achieved in humans, it would potentially prove to be less harmful to the body as well as possibly lower the risk of cancer coming back.

Image: Verita Life

One of the researchers involved with the team offered:

“In essence, this mechanism has the potential to dramatically improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy and reduce unwanted toxicity.”

In some cases, chemotherapy can work, but it does have its caveats.  With these types of treatments they very well, and do, miss some of their targets, which in turn can cause the tumors and cancers to return.  Adding in that the healthy cells, as well as the unwanted cells, can be damaged and you can understand how the researchers want this new treatment to be as good as it looks and sounds.

Image: Fox News

With the CICD treatment, some mechanisms of the current cancer cell killing methods are used.  However, with an extra added feature that, when the cancer cells are killed off, the treatment tells the immune system to attack any cancer cells that may remain.  Although the treatment to date has only been tested on lab models, it would appear if successful in humans it will provide a significantly cleaner method of removing a tumor from the body.

The main hypothesis in the treatment is that the therapy itself would not be what actually kills off the cancer cells.  The body’s immune system would be the actual killer, swooping in and finishing off the nasty cancer cells for good.